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Saturday, June 6, 2009

Canning Tomatoes

Soon it will be time to preserve your abundance of tomatoes. Please note the "how to" below and follow it religiously!

Canning Tomatoes

Source: Adaptations from Dr. George York
& USDA publication


Yield: 2½ to 3½ pounds of tomatoes per quart jar.

Choose sound, ripe tomatoes that are fresh and firm; discarding spoiled or green tomatoes. Green tomatoes contain an alkaloid that may be toxic. DO NOT CAN OVERRIPE TOMATOES; they may be too low in acid for safe water bath canning. Prepare just enough tomatoes to fill the canner each time.

Wash. Dip in boiling water long enough to crack skins. Dip in cold water. Peel and remove cores. Save any juice to add to the tomatoes when heating.

To Hot Pack Tomatoes: Bring whole, peeled tomatoes to a boil. Pack HOT into clean, hot jars leaving ½ inch headspace. Cover with the hot liquid in which the tomatoes were heated. Add 1 teaspoon salt (optional) and 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice or 3 tablespoons vinegar or ½ teaspoon citric acid per quart. Remove bubbles with a non-metallic spatula. Wipe rim with clean, damp cloth. Seal with prepared lids.

To Raw Pack: Pack raw, whole, peeled tomatoes tightly to the tops of hot jars. Press tomatoes down after each two tomatoes are added to release juice and fill spaces. Add 1 teaspoon salt (optional) and 2 tablespoons bottled lemon juice or 2 tablespoons vinegar or ½ teaspoon citric acid per quart. Remove bubbles. Wipe rim with clean, damp cloth. Seal with lids prepared according to manufacturer's directions.

Process: Place jars in a simmering water bath that covers the tops of the jars. Start timing when water returns to a gentle boil--200° to 210° F.


Cold Pack: Pints 30 minutes
Quarts 45 minutes

Raw Pack: Pints 45 minutes
Quarts 45 minutes


Cool jars, on a rack, free from drafts and undisturbed for 12 hours. Remove rings, check for seal. Wash. Label. Store in a cool, dry, dark place.

Note: Add lemon juice, citric acid or vinegar directly to the jars before filling with product, or to the top after packing. Add sugar to offset acid taste, if desired. The method for processing tomato-vegetable mixtures, such as stewed tomatoes or tomato sauce will depend on the recipe. Addition of low acid vegetables to tomatoes affects the pH and, without the addition of significant amounts of acid, requires pressure canning. Home-canned tomato juice usually separates. It is hard to duplicate at home the commercially used "hot break" extraction method

1 comment:

Bill Bird said...

We canned 24 pints of heirloom tomatoes last year, our first attempt at it (BWB) and also did 13 pints of salsa and 32 quarts of pickles.

It was all delicious. We only have two jars of pickles left! Everything else is gone!